Introduction to GitOps with OpenShift

Introduction to GitOps with OpenShift

In this blog post we are going to introduce the principles and patterns of GitOps and how you can implement these patterns on OpenShift. If you’re interested in diving into an interactive tutorial, try this link. What is GitOps? GitOps in short is a set of practices to use Git pull requests to manage infrastructure […]

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OpenShift 4: Image Builds

OpenShift 4: Image Builds

One of the key differentiators of Red Hat OpenShift as a Kubernetes distribution is the ability to build container images using the platform via first class APIs. This means there is no separate infrastructure or manual build processes required to create images that will be run on the platform. Instead, the same infrastructure can be […]

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Enhancing your Builds on OpenShift: Chaining Builds

Enhancing your Builds on OpenShift: Chaining Builds

In addition to the typical scenario of using source code as the input to a build, OpenShift build capabilities provides another build input type called “Image source”, that will stream content from one image (source) into another (destination).

Using this, we can combine source from one or multiple source images. And we can pass one or multiple files and/or folders from a source image to a destination image. Once the destination image has been built it will be pushed into the registry (or an external registry), and will be ready to be deployed.

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OpenShift Pipelines with Jenkins Blue Ocean

OpenShift Pipelines with Jenkins Blue Ocean

Jenkins Blue Ocean is the new user experience for Jenkins to provide more flexibility for building and interacting with CI/CD pipelines. Using OpenShift certified Jenkins docker image and S2I process for customizing Jenkins, Blue Ocean can easily be enabled on Jenkins on OpenShift.

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Maven Multi-Module Projects and OpenShift

Maven Multi-Module Projects and OpenShift

There is no need to move away from Maven’s multi-module approach to building and deploying application when working with OpenShift, if that is a process you’re familiar with. It can become a powerful tool for helping break apart existing applications into more consumable microservices as it goes some way to enabling each component to have its own lifecycle, regardless of how the source code repository is managed. Sometimes it may require a little bit of customisation to give you the behaviour you need, and hopefully you’ll get some insight into how that customisation is achieved through this post.

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