Using New Relic to Monitor Applications on OpenShift

Using New Relic to Monitor Applications on OpenShift

In this post, we show a way to configure New Relic to monitor an application running on OpenShift Container Platform. The repository includes a customized assemble script for Tomcat/JBoss EWS 8 that instruments an application using a New Relic Java Agent. The script for downloading and layering in New Relic Agent is baked into this assemble script.

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Red Hat Brings Cloud Native Services to Every Java Workload

Red Hat Brings Cloud Native Services to Every Java Workload

Red Hat is happy to announce the availability of a Java container image for cloud native workloads. Red Hat now expands the availability of cloud native packaging models to all Java applications that rely on OpenJDK and Maven. This builds on the proven S2I technology that has been available for OpenShift applications for many years.

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Fast Iterative Java Development on OpenShift/Kubernetes Using Rsync

Fast Iterative Java Development on OpenShift/Kubernetes Using Rsync

The key to a good development environment almost always comes down to how long it takes for changes you make to take effect. With any compiled language, there is often a lot of setup work involved to optimize deployment speed. Thankfully, one of the promises of containers is it allows for patterns to be standardized and repackaged as reusable images that do a lot of the heavy lifting for you.

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Performance Metrics (APM) for Spring Boot Microservices on OpenShift

Performance Metrics (APM) for Spring Boot Microservices on OpenShift

OpenShift provides a built-in monitoring tool called Hawkular. That tool is in charge of collecting metrics from Docker containers through the Kubernetes interface and storing, aggregating, and visualizing them. The metrics collected are CPU, Memory, Disk, and Network usage. Hawkular offers a “black-box” view of container performance but does not deal with application metrics like service performance or distribution of response time through application layers. For this specific case, the Hawkular community is working on another module called Hawkular APM that provides insight into the way an application executes across multiple (micro) services in a distributed (e.g. cloud) environment.

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Not Ready for Microservices? Evolutions and Alternatives

Not Ready for Microservices? Evolutions and Alternatives

Why did the chicken cross the road? As the old saying goes, to get the other side. Why did the company move to microservices? That answer isn’t nearly as simple. While the buzz around microservices continues to grow, it can be valuable to look at various paths that companies take to achieve their ultimate goals […]

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Looking ahead to 2017 for OpenShift

Looking ahead to 2017 for OpenShift

As we flip the calendar ahead to 2017, it’s time to look forward to the big trends that we believe will shape the next 12 months. These aren’t “predictions”, but rather an amplification of trends that the OpenShift team has seen emerging in 2016 and we believe will become more mainstream in 2017.   Vertical Industry Collaboration Whether […]

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Red Hat Brings Application-Awareness to Kubernetes

Red Hat Brings Application-Awareness to Kubernetes

Over the last few weeks, we’ve written a lot about why Red Hat OpenShift is strategically aligned to Kubernetes, as well as why we believe that OpenShift is the most Enterprise-Ready Kubernetes offering in the marketplace today. With the investment that Red Hat has made over the past several years, along with the rapid growth […]

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Maven Multi-Module Projects and OpenShift

Maven Multi-Module Projects and OpenShift

There is no need to move away from Maven’s multi-module approach to building and deploying application when working with OpenShift, if that is a process you’re familiar with. It can become a powerful tool for helping break apart existing applications into more consumable microservices as it goes some way to enabling each component to have its own lifecycle, regardless of how the source code repository is managed. Sometimes it may require a little bit of customisation to give you the behaviour you need, and hopefully you’ll get some insight into how that customisation is achieved through this post.

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